22. rattler. I'm the Sunshine in your life...even if I'm not in mine.

"in the end it will all go my way, no matter what seems to go wrong"

I love my skin!

(Source: arthaemisia)

zodiacmind:

Fun facts about your sign here

zodiacmind:

Fun facts about your sign here

Trust the vibes you get, energy doesn’t lie.

—(via sunflower-mama)

(Source: shanharlin)

xobaddestbitchez:

yungh0e:

beautifullydopeshit:

Explains everything

bruh forreal

xobaddestbitchez:

yungh0e:

beautifullydopeshit:

Explains everything

bruh forreal

fastcompany:

Plan any event and chances are one in five of the people you invite will be late.
A study done at San Francisco State University found that about 20% of the U.S. population is chronically late—but it’s not because they don’t value others’ time. It’s more complicated than that, says lead researcher Diana DeLonzor.
“Repetitive lateness is more often related to personality characteristics such as anxiety or a penchant for thrill-seeking,” she says. “Some people are drawn to the adrenaline rush of that last-minute sprint to the finish line, while others receive an ego boost from over-scheduling and filling each moment with activity.”
In her book Never Be Late Again: 7 Cures for the Punctually Challenged, DeLonzor says our relationship with time often starts in childhood and becomes an ingrained habit.
“Looking back, you were probably late or early all of your life—it’s part physiological and part psychological,” she says. “Most chronically late people truly dislike being late, but it’s a surprisingly difficult habit to overcome. Telling a late person to be on time is a little like telling a dieter to simply stop eating so much.”
DeLonzor says the majority of people have a combination of late and punctual habits—usually on time, but with a frantic rush at the last minute—but we can all learn from those who are chronically punctual. DeLonzor shares four traits that always on time share:
Read More>

fastcompany:

Plan any event and chances are one in five of the people you invite will be late.

A study done at San Francisco State University found that about 20% of the U.S. population is chronically late—but it’s not because they don’t value others’ time. It’s more complicated than that, says lead researcher Diana DeLonzor.

“Repetitive lateness is more often related to personality characteristics such as anxiety or a penchant for thrill-seeking,” she says. “Some people are drawn to the adrenaline rush of that last-minute sprint to the finish line, while others receive an ego boost from over-scheduling and filling each moment with activity.”

In her book Never Be Late Again: 7 Cures for the Punctually Challenged, DeLonzor says our relationship with time often starts in childhood and becomes an ingrained habit.

“Looking back, you were probably late or early all of your life—it’s part physiological and part psychological,” she says. “Most chronically late people truly dislike being late, but it’s a surprisingly difficult habit to overcome. Telling a late person to be on time is a little like telling a dieter to simply stop eating so much.”

DeLonzor says the majority of people have a combination of late and punctual habits—usually on time, but with a frantic rush at the last minute—but we can all learn from those who are chronically punctual. DeLonzor shares four traits that always on time share:

Read More>

barafurbear:

anotheralexandros:

tommytv:

nychealth:

Let’s stop HIV in New York City

  • If you are HIV-negative, PEP and PrEP can help you stay that way.
  • If you are HIV-positive, PEP and PrEP can help protect your partners.

 

Daily PrEP

PrEP is a daily pill that can help keep you HIV-negative as long as you take it every day.

  • Ask your doctor if PrEP (Pre-exposure Prophylaxis) may be right for you.
  • Condoms give you additional protection against HIV, other sexually transmitted infections, and unintended pregnancy.

 

Emergency PEP

If you are HIV-negative and think you were exposed to HIV, immediately go to a clinic or emergency room and ask for PEP (Post-exposure  Prophylaxis).

  • PEP can stop HIV if started within 36 hours of exposure.
  • You continue taking PEP for 28 days.

Many insurance plans including Medicaid cover PEP and PrEP. Assistance may be available if you are uninsured. Visit NYC Health’s website to find out where to get PrEP or PEP in New York City.

This is such a giant step that barely any people know about it seems, so amazing to see progress in the treatment of HIV

I honestly thought this might be exaggeration but the CDC says that PrEP is 92% effective. Damn. Damn.

reblogging because this deserves waaaay more attention D:

(Source: kushandwizdom)

I’m eligible to apply for graduation.

Since June I’ve been telling folks I’m graduating, but I’m going through the actual motions now. I can’t wait to see my mama face.


Raised by a single mother. Daughter of an immigrant. I’m not here by chance. I’m here by grace.

vixenhines:

regalasfuck:

fileformat:

STOP
me

lmfaoo


Me!

why this me tho???

vixenhines:

regalasfuck:

fileformat:

STOP

me

lmfaoo

Me!

why this me tho???

(Source: bramstifer)

niggawillyoushutthefuckup:

sassyesq:

But the way he looks after she says that melts my heart…image

Wish more men would understand the lesson here.

He looks like tyler the creator

(Source: husssel)

When someone won’t let you in, eventually you stop knocking.

—Ransom Riggs, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children
(via cygnie)

Android can be as great as it wanna be.

But as long as iMessage has a “you can’t sit with us” vibe, Apple can have all these coins.